Tags: Bob | Davids | CEO | Ego

Entrepreneur Bob Davids: CEOs Should 'Leave Ego at the Door'

Friday, 10 Feb 2012 08:16 AM

By Forrest Jones and Ashley Martella

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Chief executive officers need to leave their egos at the door because micromanaging only works against a company's progress, and not for it, says entrepreneur and business creator Bob Davids.

Micromanaging discourages decision making throughout many different levels of a business.

The result, Davids tells Newsmax.TV in an exclusive video interview, is that one brain overworks itself whereas thousands of brains in the company aren't working up to capacity, thus the business suffers and so do all involved.

"I think that the leader, instead of having ego, he needs to have the confidence to do his job. But leave the ego at the door and support the people in that organization and give them the tools and the environment for them to be successful," says Davids, CEO of Sea Smoke Vineyards.

Story continues below video.



"You don't have to go down and make every single decision. You want every brain in that organization working. As the leader, you create the environment where the people can motivate themselves to do their jobs on their own."

That doesn't mean leaders need to avoid taking tough decisions.

Leaders in Germany and other European nations are working to tell debt-ridden periphery countries what to do with their economies in order to benefit the entire eurozone, for example.

Here in the United States, however, few leaders are checking their egos at the door and aren't looking out for the best interests of the country.

Of all the Republican presidential hopefuls vying to unseat President Barack Obama, Mitt Romney shows the most promise due to his business experience.

"He's the only candidate so far that has actually made a payroll. I think that's a key ingredient to any office. I think it should be almost mandatory that you have the responsibility to know what it's like to have to reach down in your pocket and write a check so that you can keep a family working," Davids says.

"Right now I've got a winery called Sea Smoke, and we have roughly 40 employees, but I don't have 40 employees, I've got 40 families. And in that, there's probably 100 people that I am responsible for," Davids adds.

"Romney has some experience in making that payroll, and I like that. I'm not ready to endorse anybody, but I think the fact that he alone has that level of experience in actually taking money out of his pocket and paying somebody to live."

Turning to those who aren't so ambitious, Davids says the Occupy Wall Street protestors are wasting their time setting up camps to demonstrate outside of big banks.

If they used that energy looking for work, they'd be much better off and so would the country.

"I think it comes back to human nature. About half of the population is competitive and about half the population isn't. I think they are in that group that just doesn't want to compete and with that, I think there's a lack of confidence," Davids says.

"I am sure there's jobs out there. They don't want them."

America, meanwhile, may have seen its better days as China is poised to grow and prosper.

"I lived in China for 13 years. I do think that China is on the upswing. I think that Europe and the U.K. had their day in the sunlight and then America had its day in the sunlight and that sunlight passed onto Japan, and I think the sun is moving towards China right now," Davids says.

But the rising Asian giant isn't totally without potholes, says Davids, who ran a toymaker in China.

Cultural issues remain, plus low labor costs, which have been key to China's success, are rising

"They don't have the organization culturally that the other countries had, but I see them going through a spurt of growth but then I think it's going to catch up," Davids adds.

"The cultural aspects of their society will catch up to them and limit that growth. I had a company in China, and I watched the costs of labor double in five years, and I think that's going to continue and at some point will start to slow down China."

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